HRI tests cognitive training program to improve symptoms of PTSD

People diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) often experience changes in cognitive functioning, such as difficulty with memory, attention, concentration, planning and organization.

Despite the fact that these challenges can severely disrupt functioning at work, school, home, or in social settings, few studies have investigated treatments aimed specifically at improving thinking skills among individuals with PTSD.

A new study led by Homewood Research Institute (HRI) and McMaster University is examining the utility of cognitive skills training in reducing symptoms of PTSD, particularly among veterans, military members and first responders. In this study, a cognitive training program called Goal Management Training (GMT) is being offered to people with PTSD for the first time.

GMT has been used successfully in other populations, including people with brain injuries, to improve concentration, memory, and organization. GMT aims to teach individuals how to stop automatic responding, monitor progress on tasks and goals, and achieve those goals.

Early research among inpatients being treated for PTSD at Homewood Health Centre suggested that GMT helps to improve thinking speed, memory and the pursuit of personal goals. GMT also led to reductions in depression and self-reported cognitive difficulties.

The next phase of research is underway. GMT is now being tested among individuals in the community with a history of military-related trauma and those who have worked as public safety personnel, such as firefighters, paramedics or police officers. Researchers predict similar results among this outpatient population. Based on studies to date, GMT holds great promise for improving quality of life and cognitive function for individuals with PTSD.

This work is generously supported by the Cowan Foundation, the Military Casualty Support Foundation, Schlegel Healthcare and J.P. Bickell Foundation.